Magnesium: Key to a Healthy Body

Magnesium: Key to a Healthy Body

Got Magnesium? Make Sure You Have Enough of This Vital Mineral If you’re like most people, you probably don’t give magnesium a lot of thought. Maybe it’s time that you should: Magnesium is the most frequently missed mineral in our diet. About 68 percent of Americans fall short of consuming the daily-recommended amount of magnesium, according to a government study. Yet magnesium is vital for 400 chemical reactions in the body, including detoxification. Low levels may cause headaches, insomnia, fatigue, and muscle cramps. Magnesium deficiency can also affect the cardiovascular system, leading to heart palpitations, high blood pressure, and poor blood-sugar control. Read on to learn about why magnesium is so important, which foods are high in magnesium, and why you ought to consider taking magnesium in supplement form. Magnesium: Key to a Healthy Body Simply put, magnesium is essential to good health. Your body uses this mineral for hundreds of biochemical reactions every day. Magnesium contains a certain enzyme that is required to facilitate vital processes—such as metabolizing your food, and assisting with gene function. You also need magnesium to retain muscle (no wonder spinach-eating Popeye was so strong!). Your bones, too, need magnesium for mass and strength. Did you know that more than half of the magnesium in your body is in your bones? Magnesium also helps to relax your nerves and muscles. The liver—your detox organ—requires magnesium to do its work. And your heart depends on magnesium for healthy blood circulation. According to the Office of Dietary Supplements at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), magnesium may help prevent cardiovascular disease and immune dysfunction. Magnesium may...
Shingles: What You Need to Know for Effective Treatment

Shingles: What You Need to Know for Effective Treatment

Shingles – What You Need to Know: The pain and discomfort of shingles (Herpes Zoster) is something that no one should have to experience. Blistery rashes, redness, and searing pain can typically plague the affected area. Sometimes a rash can develop on the torso, neck, or arms. Shingles can also affect the face, causing eye problems in some cases. After the skin eruption clears up, the pain can still linger. This is called post-herpetic neuralgia—a very uncomfortable and exhausting condition. I have a solution for shingles and post-herpetic neuralgia—a treatment plan that works. To help you heal, I offer a three-part program that includes Homeopathy, Neural Prolotherapy, and Intravenous Vitamin Infusions. Interested to know more? Here we go. What Causes Shingles? Shingles is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV). This is the same virus that causes chickenpox. Anyone who has had chickenpox can develop shingles later in life. This is because the varicella zoster virus never really leaves the body—though it can remain dormant (inactive) for years. When the virus reactivates, shingles develops. No one knows exactly why the virus reactivates, though certain triggers can bring on shingles. These include stress, a weakened immune system, and certain drugs (such as steroids). Age, too, is a factor: More than half of shingles cases occur in people aged 60 or over. However, shingles can occur at any stage of life. The virus that causes shingles is different from the virus that causes genital herpes. Genital herpes (Herpex Simplex) is a sexually transmitted disease, while shingles (Herpes Zoster) is not. According to the CDC, nearly 1 out of every 3 people...
7 Steps to Vibrant Health

7 Steps to Vibrant Health

7 Steps to Vibrant Health Vibrant health is the secret to true quality of life, yet never before have we seen so much chronic disease. Cancer, diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and autoimmune disorders are ubiquitous today. Just 100 years ago, we didn’t have such things as Attention Deficit Disorder and Chronic Fatigue. What happened? We can’t blame genes, as these have not changed. It’s our environment that has changed, and so have our lifestyles. But we have choices—and these choices give us the power to take charge of our health and dramatically improve our lives. Research shows that 75% of diseases are due to poor lifestyle choices. That’s right: They’re preventable. Every day, we make an average of 200 decisions that impact our health—from what we have for breakfast, to our choice of cleaning products, to biking to work (with a helmet on!) instead of driving. If you quit smoking before age 35, you’ll add 5 years to your life; if you quit after 64, you’ll add 1 year to your life. Do you floss your teeth? You’re adding 5 to 6 years to your life. Get ready to become the CEO of your own health. Begin with these 7 steps – and start living your best life. 1 – Let food be thy medicine. What Hippocrates once said holds true today. Healthy living begins in the kitchen. At breakfast this morning, did you reach for a bagel (a sure way to spike your blood sugar levels) or heart-healthy oatmeal? If you had coffee with NutraSweet or Equal, did you know that aspartame sweeteners turn into methanol and formaldehyde,...
Choosing Vitamins – Important Tips for Healthy Living

Choosing Vitamins – Important Tips for Healthy Living

If you’re already taking vitamins, that’s good news. If not, it may be time to start. There’s a lot of science behind the benefits of vitamin supplementation. Every once in a while, a study will come out that seems to reverse this science. These studies might suggest that vitamins are useless at preventing cancer or extending longevity. But they say nothing about how vitamins can help improve your everyday health and quality of life. We need vitamins to support many vital functions in the body, such as energy production and detoxification. Truth be told, vitamin supplementation can make all the difference in supporting optimal health and vitality. But not just any old vitamin will do. The next time you shop for vitamins, consider these five important tips: Don’t always settle for the cheapest version. True, vitamins can be expensive—but don’t just reach for the discounted vial. A low price tag on vitamins could be a red flag. If you do buy cheaper versions, do your research: Who is producing them? Is it a reliable source? Does the manufacturer have a certificate of accuracy? Look for a certification symbol from an organization that checks supplements for purity and quality—such as United States Pharmacopeia and NSF International. Opt for three-times-a-day vitamins instead of the once-a-day variety. The idea of a one-stop shop for vitamins is very appealing. ‘Once a Day’ multivitamins are convenient and affordable, yet they’re not problem-free. For starters, these tablets are covered with a special film for slow absorption. As a result, they’re hard to digest and have poor bioavailability. Vitamins that you take three times a day...